After a royal jubilee, a queenly art collection in the UK; farther east, Japan-Inspired NFT portal launched

Home » After a royal jubilee, a queenly art collection in the UK; farther east, Japan-Inspired NFT portal launched
The famous Armada Portrait (1588) on loan from Woburn Abbey is on view at Sotheby's in a free exhibition centred on power and image. Photograph: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for Sotheby's | Via The Guardian

A SUMMARY OF THE MOST EXCITING ART NEWS FROM AROUND THE GLOBE

While we focus on Indian art, we can’t obviously function in a vacuum. It’s a small world and everything is connected, especially on the web. So, let’s train our spotlight across the world map to see what’s going on — from art trends to socio-political issues to everything that affects the great aesthetic global consciousness. Or, let’s just travel the world and have some fun!

 

New Sotheby’s show of power, prestige and pearls stars 7 queens 

Queen Victoria by George Hayter (1838). Photograph: Private collection | Via The Guardian

Sotheby’s auction house has assembled portraits of all the regnant queens from the Tudors onwards, with the exception of Lady Jane Grey, the teenager who claimed the throne for just nine days, for the show Power & Image: Royal Portraiture & Iconography. Some of these “portraits of power” are better remembered than others in the five centuries covered, but leading the pack, eclipsed perhaps only by a selection of modern portraits of the current queen, is Elizabeth I. The famous Armada Portrait, attributed to George Gower, serjeant painter to the queen from 1581, has been loaned by Woburn Abbey, owner of the best preserved of the three versions of this work. Hans Eworth’s portrait of Queen Mary I, known as Bloody Mary, has been ferried across Mayfair from the Society of Antiquaries, based in Burlington House, Piccadilly. The Guardian elaborates on these and many other details. 

 

Japan-inspired NFT portal or JINP announced  

In the first series, titled “JUU-NIN-TO-IRO” 10 illustrators will create NFTs to express traditional Japanese colors | Via PR Newswire

A new NFT art brand inspired by Japan plans to combine the island nation’s traditional and modern cultures. The product is being launched by the companies CyberZ, Inc. and OEN, Inc. Each release features a 4-character kanji compound name and themes such as kanji characters, Japanese colors, Japanese painting, and kimono. The first release will be titled “JUU-NIN-TO-IRO” — a series of NFTs created by 10 top illustrators based on the theme of “traditional colors of Japan”. The second release titled “ON-KO-CHI-SHIN” is Japanese traditional artwork themed NFTs produced by photographer RK, a top-selling Japanese artist on the Foundation NFT marketplace. Cision PR Newswire breaks it down. 

 

Art school collection comes back to New Zealand after 6 decades away 

The pieces, created by Auckland Art school students, disappeared overseas in the early 1960s. (Source: 1News)

A unique art collection has returned to New Zealand after 60 years abroad. The pieces were created by Auckland Art School students in the early 1960s, before disappearing overseas. Artists Gretchen Albrecht and Geoff Thornley say they had no idea their original work still existed. Sixty years ago, their former art teacher Kurt von Maier moved to us and took the pieces with him. He died in 2011 and the collection, fully preserved, was recently discovered and given to art historian Hamish Keith. Keith, in turn, gifted it to Auckland’s Waiheke island art gallery. 1News reports. 

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