Abirpothi

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Key people to step down from key positions

A SUMMARY OF THE MOST EXCITING ART NEWS FROM AROUND THE GLOBE

While we focus on Indian art, we can’t obviously function in a vacuum. It’s a small world and everything is connected, especially on the web. So, let’s train our spotlight across the world map to see what’s going on — from art trends to socio-political issues to everything that affects the great aesthetic global consciousness. Or, let’s just travel the world and have some fun!

Marc Spiegler steps down as global director of Art Basel

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Just a week after the launch of Art Basel’s first Paris edition, the leading art fair company, which also hosts events in Switzerland, Miami Beach, and Hong Kong, has announced a major change in its leadership. Marc Spiegler, who has been with Art Basel for over 15 years, will depart his role as global director, and he will be succeeded in the newly created role of CEO by an Art Basel veteran, Noah Horowitz. Spiegler will stay on through the end of the year, including for the run of the 20th edition of Art Basel Miami Beach, which is scheduled to take place November 29–December 3, while Horowitz will rejoin the company on November 7. “As the outgoing Global Director, Marc Spiegler will hand over the running of the business to Noah Horowitz at this juncture,” according to a release. In 2007, Spiegler joined MCH Group, Art Basel’s parent company, as co-director of the fair, and was named global director in 2012. During his tenure, he staged 43 art fairs, including the first editions in Hong Kong and Paris, which launched in 2013 and 2022, respectively. Read more on Artnet News.

Frances Morris, director of Tate Modern to depart

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Frances Morris will depart from her post as Tate Modern’s director at the end of April 2023. Over the course of the last two decades, she served in various role at the London museum, as head of displays and as director of the its international art collection. In 2016, she was appointed as director at Tate Modern, becoming the first women to lead the museum. Morris began her tenure at Tate as a curator in 1987, following a stint at Arnolfini gallery in Bristol. She holds degrees from Cambridge and the Courtauld Institute of Art, and has served in advisory roles on various museum groups in the U.K. “Over three and a half decades later I feel privileged to have been nurtured by an institution that has transformed itself from within,” Morris said in a statement to ARTnews. “And to have contributed to an extraordinary period of growth in the contemporary art scene in the UK and across the world.” Details on Art news.

Stained-glass windows at Yale addressing the university\’s ties to racist practice

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For 84 years, one of Yale University’s residential colleges was named for former US president John C. Calhoun, a Yale graduate who was an ardent supporter of slavery. But in July 2017, in a turnabout, the school officially dropped Calhoun’s name, denouncing him as a white supremacist, and elected to instead honour another alumnus, the pioneering computer scientist and mathematician Grace Murray Hopper. The name change occurred amid a multi-year reckoning with Calhoun’s legacy that came to a head in 2016 when Corey Menafee, a Black dining-hall worker, smashed a stained-glass window in the college that depicted enslaved people picking cotton—one of several in a series that glorified the antebellum South. Now, following lengthy discussions about the college’s history, present and future, the university has permanently replaced a dozen windows in the building with ones designed by artists Faith Ringgold and Barbara Earl Thomas. Commissioned by Yale, the new windows commemorate various communities on campus, from students to staff, while also acknowledging the school’s ties to racist practices. Thomas’s six designs are installed in the college’s dining hall, replacing problematic windows including the one Menafee had smashed. Ringgold’s six are in its common room, replacing an entire set of windows that were a visual timeline of Calhoun’s life. For more read Art Newspaper.

 

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